Abstract

Scientific experiments have already been conducted to test the scope and limits of memory modifying technologies. In the future, this research can potentially spur a host of practical applications, including helping patients regain lost memory function or manage the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. However, there is also the prospect of applying this research for the purposes of memory enhancement. How can we think through the ethical landscape of memory editing technologies? What value-based considerations should biomedical engineers be aware of that might help guide their work? This session will provide an analytical framework to help interrogate the socio-ethical basis for potential legal regulation of such technologies. It will also highlight instructional strategies to help biomedical scientists and engineers develop more robust ethical literacies and human-centred design sensibilities.

Speaker’s Bio

Dr Teoh Chin Leong was trained as a bioethicist at the Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE), NUS, where he was the first PhD graduate from their programme. At NUS, he taught at the Health Ethics, Law and Professionalism (HELP) programme at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, implemented extensive outreach activities in bioethics for pre-tertiary students, and facilitated workshops and discussions at various public hospitals for doctors and nurses, with teachers and lecturers from schools and polytechnics, and with research scientists and policymakers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star). Dr Teoh has more than a decade of experience in designing curriculum and teaching within the Gifted & Talented Education and Integrated Programme environments in Singapore, and is actively involved in capacity-building initiatives for educators in the areas of ethics, citizenship and Philosophy in Schools. He maintains a strong interest in curriculum and pedagogical innovation which informs his approach to research and teaching.

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